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Trello vs Asana: Which project management software reigns supreme?

 



Whether you work as a freelancer or oversee small teams for enterprise level companies, project management tools are essential if you want to stay efficient and organized. Today, two applications that dominate the project management workspace are Trello and Asana. Both are industry leading apps used by both startups and Fortune 100 companies for team collaboration, and both have free versions that you can start using right now.


However, there are fundamental differences between the two in functionality, integrations, workflows, pricing, and features.


At a glance, Trello is the platform to go to if your primary project management tool is a kanban board, because that's undoubtedly the best it does. The Kanban board is very easy to use, and you can add other functions to Trello with boosters.


If you are looking for more features and flexibility, you may prefer Asana.


why is that?


Trello vs Asana: Which project management software reigns supreme?





That's because Asana lets you break down projects into specific categories and groups of tasks with specific employees. Other features include Gantt charts (starting with a business plan), subtasks, and customizable dashboards.


Asana also has a kanban-style layout, but it's not as powerful as Trello.


However, no app can do everything, so it is imperative that you familiarize yourself with both apps to determine which one is best for you. This is why I put Trello vs Asana into a detailed analysis of each platform's features, pricing, and support.




Asana vs. Trello: What’s the difference?




If you have never used any project management apps before, you may not know anything about Asana or Trello. Both offer project management solutions for freelancers and companies, but the main difference lies in the features they focus on. In particular, Trello relies heavily on the Kanban board to manage the work.




What is a kanban board?




It is a visualization tool that uses cards to represent tasks (along with due dates for each card), columns to represent workflow stages, and lanes to represent different teams and activities. The Kanban board is one of the most effective ways to monitor project progress due to its simplicity, which is what Trello focuses on most.


On the other hand, Asana also features a kanban board, but it is not the main focus of the app. Instead, Asana has more powerful task management features, including plenty of customization.




With Asana, users can assign individual tasks to taskers in a feature, story, or project. There is also a calendar view and a task list for each team member containing their current tasks (as well as their deadlines).


In short, Asana works best with more complex projects that require a lot of teamwork, while Trello excels at more straightforward tasks. As such, the application you choose will depend greatly on the scope of your project.




Who are the main users of Trello?





Because of its simplicity, Trello is excellent for freelancers wanting to keep track of some daily tasks. It's also an excellent tool for smaller teams that don't want to spend a lot of time dealing with a steep learning curve.


This is because the Trello board view is so easy to use and simplified that anyone can learn how to use it without the need for tutorials.


If you'd rather go ahead with a new project than learn the ins and outs of Asana's more powerful features, Trello is an excellent choice. It's also free to use (as long as you don't add any extra powers), which makes it even more attractive to freelancers and small businesses.


However, if your work is a bit more complex and includes many moving parts, then Asana may be the best choice.





Who are the main users of Trello?




Because of its simplicity, Trello is excellent for freelancers wanting to keep track of some daily tasks. It's also an excellent tool for smaller teams that don't want to spend a lot of time dealing with a steep learning curve.


This is because the Trello board view is so easy to use and simplified that anyone can learn how to use it without the need for tutorials.




If you'd rather go ahead with a new project than learn the ins and outs of Asana's more powerful features, Trello is an excellent choice. It's also free to use (as long as you don't add any extra powers), which makes it even more attractive to freelancers and small businesses.


However, if your work is a bit more complex and includes many moving parts, then Asana may be the best choice.





Who are the primary users of Asana?



If you're managing a lot of tasks and projects at once, Asana can help you keep track of all of that. Compared to Trello, Asana can do more with task dependencies.


What are these?


In project management, task dependencies refer to the specific order in which certain tasks must be completed.





An example of this is specifying that a blog post cannot move into the publishing phase until the editing/creation of the image is complete. Another example is that electrical work cannot begin until drywall is installed.


With Asana, you can easily add dependencies to any task, which is a definite plus. This way, you won't have to worry about getting certain phases of the project out of commission.


That's why many large companies choose Asana over Trello due to the variety of features and customizable options.




Trello vs Asana: In-Depth Features Overview




Now it's time to take a closer look at the core features of both apps to decide which one best suits your needs.


Off the bat, it's important to note that Asana offers more features from the two by default. Although it is possible to add more capabilities to Trello, it does include power-ups (either by Trello or a third party), and these tend to be fail-safe.


Trello main features


As mentioned earlier, the Trello interface revolves around the Kanban-style features, which consist of:


  • boards. Trello's Kanban Board is where every project lives. They keep all of your tasks organized along every stage of the project, from “to-dos” to “completed tasks”. The boards are very visual in nature and easy to read, even if you've never used a kanban board before.
  • lists. Each panel will also have a list view, which represents the stages of each project. These include tasks, tasks, and direct - but you can also create custom fields. This way, if your project has unique phases, you can edit the list to reflect them.
  • cards. Finally, the cards on each board represent individual tasks. Each card contains all the information a team member needs to get the job done, including the due date and any special requirements. To visualize the progress of each task, you move the cards through each stage (mission, verb, done).




As you can see, Trello provides a very straightforward approach to project management that is easy to pick up and use.




Each Trello card contains a lot of useful information, including:


  1. members. These are the ones assigned to each task, letting you know who is responsible for completing each task at all times.
  2. Due dates. Keep your team members motivated and on track by including clear deadlines for each Trello Card.
  3. attachments. This is a convenient feature, as it allows you to attach anything to the card as you would to an email. This way, your team will have all the files, resources, and attachments they need to get the job done right from Trello.
  4. Checklists. This feature allows you to break down tasks into smaller tasks on Trello. You can provide a checklist for each card that contains all the stages to completion. This will enable you to monitor the progress in real time, which is useful.



Besides these core features, Trello also boasts some great integrations, including:


  • Salesforce
  • Slack
  • Dropbox
  • Qutlook
  • Gmail
  • InVision
  • Jira



These integrations make tracking your team's progress easy without having to change any of your usual tools. For example, if your team uses Salesforce regularly, integrating it with Trello will allow you to easily send information between the two.




Trello . power ups




If you are a fan of Trello's minimalist visual style but want more features, you can opt for its enhancements. These are integrations that come from both Trello and third-party developers.


For this reason, Trello power ups can vary in quality, sometimes drastically. On average, the power lifts offered by Trello tend to be the most reliable and of the highest quality. Third-party power-ups are more dangerous, but that doesn't mean they're all bad.


It just means that it can be hard to tell if the strength boost is worth it or not, a risk you won't have to take with Asana.


That being said, here's a look at some of the most powerful power-ups you can add to Trello.


Evaluation. Trello's most downloaded functional tool is Calendar, an app that puts all your active projects into one central calendar. This makes it easy to spot projects and tasks that are behind schedule so you can get them back on track. The calendar app also includes color-coded organization to Trello Cards, and you can export your calendar for integration with other third-party apps.


Sync board. Another popular feature is Board Sync, which allows you to sync projects together (including all cards, lists, and boards).


crmble. Would you like your project management software to double as a CRM (Customer Relationship Management)? If so, then Crmble is the power source for you. It's an easy-to-use CRM that you can use right from Trello, which means you never have to leave the CRM app.




Lots of other power-ups are available, including Google Drive integrations and Gantt charts.


It is important to note that not every play of Trello is free. Some, but the majority are considered premium power-ups and require an additional fee. Given that, Asana has the advantage here as all of its features come by default without you having to spend money on add-ons.




Main Features of Asana



Instead of a kanban board, the asana is centered around the patented Asana Work Graph® model. It uses a series of charts, dashboards, and calendars to visualize your business projects, your team, and the people doing the work.


In particular, Asana represents your work schedule as a graph filled with all your tasks.


You can assign each task to the taxpayer - since they have their own dashboard. There, they can see the tasks assigned to them, the deadline, and a lot of other information about the project.




You can include attachments and hot links in the description of each task to make sure your team has everything it needs to complete the project.


The timeline view is fully adjustable and uses drag and drop controls, so you can make adjustments to it quickly (such as unexpected reversals or ahead of schedule). You can use these timelines to organize marketing campaigns, plan events, product launches, and more.




Other features include:



  • Convert spreadsheets to Asana timesheets. A very useful feature (especially if you're migrating from using Excel as a project management tool) is importing a CSV file and automatically converting it to an Asana timeline. This way, you can quit using cumbersome spreadsheets without having to enter them into Asana manually.
  • Powerful automation tools. With Asana, you can automate much of the busy work involved in project management. You can automatically direct new tasks to the correct project, automatically assign teammates, automate due dates, and more.
  • Built-in calendar view. Unlike Trello, Asana comes with a calendar view that you can use without downloading an add-on. Its visualization tools make it easy to spot gaps and overlaps in your schedule, which is a plus.




Like Trello, Asana can integrate with many third-party apps and tools, including:




  • Microsoft Office 365
  • Slack
  • Jira
  • Zapier
  • Canva
  • YouTube
  • Loom
  • Adobe Creative Cloud
  • Many others



To see a full list of apps that Asana can integrate with, click here.


Asana has many valuable and customizable features so that you easily win this match. However, if simplicity is what you value above all else, you may prefer Trello.




Trello vs Asana: Pricing Plans



Now it's time to compare Trello vs Asana in terms of pricing. First, I'll start by comparing the free Trello and Asana plans.


In this regard, Asana is the winner. That's because with its free plan you get a lot more features than you get from Trello (again, the power-ups are what's holding it back).




With the free Asana plan, you get the following:


  • A list view
  • A calendar
  • A kanban board
  • Unlimited projects
  • Unlimited cloud storage





With the free Trello plan, you get:



  • A kanban board
  • 10 projects
  • Unlimited cloud storage
  • Two-factor authentication




As you can see, you get unlimited projects with the free Asana plan (Trello limits you to 10), plus a few other features that are missing from Trello.





Trello pricing plans



Here's a look at the paid Trello plans:




  1. Standard plan. Tello's first paid option is the Standard plan, which is $6 per month or $60 per year ($5 per month). Payment is made on a per user basis, so you will need to pay for additional users. With the Standard plan, you get unlimited panels, advanced checklists, custom fields, individual panel guests, 1,000 workspace commands run each month, and saved searches.
  2. Excellent plan. Next is the Premium plan, which is $12.50 per month or $120 per year ($10 per month). New features include unlimited runs of workspace commands, calendar and schedule workspace views, workspace-wide templates, groups, monitors, and priority support.
  3. Enterprise plan. Finally, the Enterprise plan costs $17.50 a month, or $210 a year (still $17.50). The exclusive features of this plan include unlimited workspaces, enterprise level permissions, multiple guests, attachment permissions, free single sign-on and user provisioning.
  4. Realistically, there is not much use of the Premium or Enterprise plans for most users. If you are freelance or you are a small team that uses Trello, 9 times out of 10, the Standard or Free plan will suffice.




Asana pricing plans




Asana's pricing structure looks like this:




  • Excellent plan. Above the free plan is the Premium plan, which costs $13.49 per month or $131.88 per year ($10.99 per month). Exclusive features include unlimited basics, four project views, automated workflows, reporting, community support, and extended security.
  • Action Plan. Next is the Business plan, which is $30.49 per month or $299.88 per year ($24.99 per month). Features include advanced workflows and advanced reports.
  • Enterprise plan. Like Trello, Asana also has an Enterprise plan. However, it is not a standard plan and requires you to contact the sales department to find out more. This plan is for large businesses that need more visibility, control, and support than Asana's Premium and Business plans.




As you can see, Asana plans are a bit more expensive than Trello, but they tend to offer more functionality, especially the Premium plan.




Trello vs Asana: Support



Finally, let's compare how both apps handle customer support. After all, if no one is there to answer your questions, why bother downloading the app? Here's a look at the support options for both platforms.


In this category, Trello is the clear winner with a long shot.





why is that?


That's because Trello has a much more robust and active customer support system. If you have a question, you can get an answer relatively quickly through live chat or over the phone.


On the other hand, Asana focuses almost all of its support on its own knowledge base, which consists of guides and tutorials. If you have questions, you can contact support, but they tend to respond more slowly than Trello.




Referee: Trello vs. Asana




Now, we've looked at Trello vs. Asana in terms of features, pricing, and support — so it's time to take a look at the judge's scorecards for a final verdict.


Let's count it:


Features: Asana


Pricing: Asana


Support: Trello


While both apps are project management forces, Asana wins by split decision. It's a much more powerful and customizable tool than Trello, which is why it's got a nod. However, Trello remains the perfect app if you prefer to use kanban boards and your projects aren't too complicated.



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